Food: a dialogue

Words by ANDY MASON and BREANA MACPHERSON-RICE   b: what should we have for dinner? a: god, i don’t know - it’s so complicated. i feel overwhelmed by so many different ideas about food, i just don’t know where to begin. it’s too hard, let’s just go get drunk? b: don’t be a goose, we have to eat. what are you worried about? a: i don’t know where to start, i feel like any choice i make will be wrong in some way. i’m just always alone in the kitchen, alone in the supermarket or wherever and it’s impossible for me to make choices that don’t harm me, or animals, or forests or communities somewhere. it’s easier not to bother. b: yeah, i can relate to that. i always feel really anxious whenever i’m in a supermarket - i go in with this idea that i can make my purchases align with my values, but it always seems futile, especially on my measly budget. a: and sometimes...
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Lizard Bites Back: a photo essay

Lizard Bites Back: a photo essay

Words and images by ANDY CALLER. Roxby Downs Protestival – The Lizard Bites Back! – saw activists use non-violent direct action to raise awareness of: the expansion of pre-existing mine at Roxby Downs, the significant impacts of the exposed waste in tailings dams (contaminated water containing radioactive material that is a by-product of mining), and the continued occupation of the First Nations people of Kokatha county and surrounds. Willing to confront the mouth of the beast at the “gates of hell”, Olympic Dam uranium mine, the activists, environmentalists and concerned citizens present were not deterred by the threat of a high police presence – armed as they were with defection stickers, horses and a stone-cold resentment for being there. There has been criticism in response to the use of the non-violent direct actions at The Lizard Bites Back. Some have called out the aspects of white privilege present, with activists not taking into account of the use of mutated white babies as props, when it was not...
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University research should be for public good, not private interest

When receiving an award for her proficiency at exploration geophysics, Jodie dropped a banner to draw to attention how University research is often driven by private interest – to the detriment of the urgent issue of climate change. By JODIE PALL I dropped a banner at the School of Geosciences awards night earlier this year that read, ‘Geologist wants research for climate justice, not corporate interest.’  As an environmental activist, it seemed ironic to be receiving a prize for being a whiz at the methods used in locating coal, oil and gas reservoirs for resource extraction. I doubt I am the only geology student or researcher at the University of Sydney grappling with the dilemma of loving the science of geology, but not at all wanting to be involved in mining. Blocking research on climate change The imminence of the threat of climate change in abundantly clear, as is the contribution of fossil fuel extraction to this ecological emergency. Geoscientists work and research at the...
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Roadtrip to Newcastle

Yesterday the ASEN road trip crew travelled up to Newcastle and was taken for a tour of the Newcastle Port by our travel guide Jonothan Moylan. From Nobby’s Headland, we saw the dredging boat taking out sediment to dump it offshore widen the channel to accomodate more coal exports. We stood over the large arterial railway that takes coal trains to and from the port day in and day out, not even breaking for holidays. There coal trains are not covered and the coal dust poses a health risk to the 23,000 children who go to a school within 500m of the train line. (more…)...
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