Anti-Uranium Protesters Arrested at Breakfast

This morning three student activists were arrested at the Lizards Revenge anti-nuclear festival. Thirty protesters were breakfasting on the road to the Olympic Dam uranium mine in order to blockade trucks entering the mine site.

Six people were arrested in total while eating toast with intent. They have been taken to Roxby Downs  police station and are likely to be held without bail overnight. Many others have driven to town in solidarity to wait for the arrestees’ release.

The blockade was part of a week of peaceful non-violent protest to promote creative alternatives to the nuclear industry. Lizards Revenge is in solidarity with the Arabunna and Kokatha indigenous nations in opposing the expansion of the Olympic Dam uranium mine on their sacred desert lands. Think Priscilla with a cause.

Asked why he opposed the mine’s expansion, one protester explained:

‘uranium leaves radioactive waste for thousands of years, it’s used in nuclear weapons, and any accidents – like at Fukushima – are really dangerous. We can’t handle that, and we have alternatives like wind and solar’.

The six arrestees hope that their action will inspire all Australians to consider whether the nuclear industry should be allowed to continue. 

Anti-Uranium Protesters Arrested at Breakfast

This morning three student activists were arrested at the Lizards Revenge anti-nuclear festival. Thirty protesters were breakfasting on the road to the Olympic Dam uranium mine in order to blockade trucks entering the mine site.

Six people were arrested in total while eating toast with intent. They have been taken to Roxby Downs  police station and are likely to be held without bail overnight. Many others have driven to town in solidarity to wait for the arrestees’ release.

The blockade was part of a week of peaceful non-violent protest to promote creative alternatives to the nuclear industry. Lizards Revenge is in solidarity with the Arabunna and Kokatha indigenous nations in opposing the expansion of the Olympic Dam uranium mine on their sacred desert lands. Think Priscilla with a cause.

Asked why he opposed the mine’s expansion, one protester explained:

‘uranium leaves radioactive waste for thousands of years, it’s used in nuclear weapons, and any accidents – like at Fukushima – are really dangerous. We can’t handle that, and we have alternatives like wind and solar’.

The six arrestees hope that their action will inspire all Australians to consider whether the nuclear industry should be allowed to continue. 

Uranium 'UnAustralian' say Protesters

Scoring a six never felt so good. Today anti-nuclear protesters played a cricket match against uranium at the Lizard’s Revenge festival at Roxby Downs. The demonstrators called the nuclear industry ‘UnAustralian’.

‘It’s not welcome here’ said Tim Johnson, ‘it risks our water, land and people. We don’t want any part of the nuclear chain – the mines, the power or the waste’.

Yesterday the protest turned glamorous with a parade of Frocks on the Frontline, synchronised mass dances and performances. More solemn expressions of dissent included three minutes of silence to remember Fukushima – the Japanese power plant that exploded in 2011 and spread radioactive dust as. Several protesters and police officers shed tears during the silence. The uranium used in Fukushima was mined at Olympic Dam.

Later today, a wind and solar-powered cinema night is planned to demonstrate that sustainable energy sources are viable alternatives to nuclear power.

Over three hundred protesters have gathered from all around Australia to voice their dissent to the mine’s expansion. If expanded, the Olympic Dam uranium mine will be the largest open-pit uranium mine in the world. It will use 42 million litres of water from the Great Artesian Basin each day in the driest state on the driest inhabited continent on earth. The South Australian government provides that water to BHP at no charge. Eight million litres of radioactive waste will leak into the underground aquifer each day. By the end of the mine’s life, radioactive tailings equivalent to nine Sydney Harbours will be left on the surface of the land forever.

Uranium ‘UnAustralian’ say Protesters

Scoring a six never felt so good. Today anti-nuclear protesters played a cricket match against uranium at the Lizard’s Revenge festival at Roxby Downs. The demonstrators called the nuclear industry ‘UnAustralian’.

‘It’s not welcome here’ said Tim Johnson, ‘it risks our water, land and people. We don’t want any part of the nuclear chain – the mines, the power or the waste’.

Yesterday the protest turned glamorous with a parade of Frocks on the Frontline, synchronised mass dances and performances. More solemn expressions of dissent included three minutes of silence to remember Fukushima – the Japanese power plant that exploded in 2011 and spread radioactive dust as. Several protesters and police officers shed tears during the silence. The uranium used in Fukushima was mined at Olympic Dam.

Later today, a wind and solar-powered cinema night is planned to demonstrate that sustainable energy sources are viable alternatives to nuclear power.

Over three hundred protesters have gathered from all around Australia to voice their dissent to the mine’s expansion. If expanded, the Olympic Dam uranium mine will be the largest open-pit uranium mine in the world. It will use 42 million litres of water from the Great Artesian Basin each day in the driest state on the driest inhabited continent on earth. The South Australian government provides that water to BHP at no charge. Eight million litres of radioactive waste will leak into the underground aquifer each day. By the end of the mine’s life, radioactive tailings equivalent to nine Sydney Harbours will be left on the surface of the land forever.

Photos from the May 1st rally, to “Protect our Land and Water” from the ravages of the Coal Seam Gas industry. We walked from Martin Place, to Parliament House in Sydney, joining close to 10, 000 people from all over the state, all with their own stories to tell about the effects of CSG on their communities.

It was galvanising to march with so many people – students, farmers, environmentalists, the CWA – who are traditionally skeptical of each other. We’d found a common enemy: government in the pocket of extractive industries. Hopefully we’re also on the way to forging common values and interests: care for community, environment, food and water.

– Aimee

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